‘I Want Mommy!’: 3 Ways To Cope With Kids Who Play Favorites ‘I Want Mommy!’: 3 Ways To Cope With Kids Who Play Favorites
What do you do when your kid suddenly calls for Mommy all the time? While this is a great blow, there are things that... ‘I Want Mommy!’: 3 Ways To Cope With Kids Who Play Favorites

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What do you do when your kid suddenly calls for Mommy all the time? While this is a great blow, there are things that you can do to turn this around.

According to Parents.com, more than 90 percent of parents confessed having kids who favor one parent over the other at a certain point. While this is a sad fact, the website said that playing favorites is actually a sign of emotional and cognitive development. These kids are trying to explore relationships and intimacy while practicing independence and decision-making skills.

The dreadful situation may turn out to be a great learning experience and make the family closer. Popsugar, MetroParent, and Parents.com give you ways on how to successfully deal with kids playing favorites.

1. Schedule One-On-One Time

Most kids would feel bad towards a parent who is away most of the time. This could breed resentment and result to playing favorites. However, the parent should not take it personally and give the kid time to work out his feelings. Be sure that when the kid needs you, you are emotionally available.

“It’s best not to look at it as favoritism. We all have different roles,” says Rockwell, a clinical psychologist and adjunct professor at the Michigan School of Professional Psychology in Farmington Hills.

Be sure to spend time alone with your kids, especially if you’re away often. Taking your kid ou for an ice cream or a special trip to the park to walk the dog can re-establish the connection.

2. Take Turns Playing The Bad Guy

It is natural to favor the parent who always says “Yes”. More so, kids would favor the parent who would splurge on treats. Take turns in issuing time outs and giving out of treats. It is recommended to share the responsibility of discipline equally.

While some kids can be manipulative, it is important for both parents to be consistent with their rules so they can avoid favoritism. Giving in to your kid’s demand will only make it worse.


3. Wait It Out

Don’t fret when your toddler shows signs of favoritism. As mentioned earlier, it is not personal. It doesn’t also mean that you’re a bad parent or there’s lack of connection. Sometimes, it’s just a phase in a kid’s growing years. Understand that it is normal and exert patience to wait until the phase ends.

Simple acts like listening can foster a bond with your kid. “Don’t correct them, don’t try to educate them … listen to who your children are and where they’re going in the world,” Dr. Donna Rockwell said. “That’s better than ice cream.”

Remember, little things count. So tuck in your kids or cuddle up with a book. The best way to win your child’s heart is through quality time. To spend some quality time with your kids, check out the video below:


Henry Okafor

  • Faith

    August 3, 2016 #1 Author

    This is great! Going to attempt these when I babysit!

    Reply

  • Jaylee

    August 3, 2016 #2 Author

    These are great tips although they don’t really work

    Reply

  • Christania carter

    August 3, 2016 #3 Author

    So true! My son play’s favoritism a bunch! Love the tips!

    Reply

  • Lora H.

    August 3, 2016 #4 Author

    This is a great read, and has awesome tips on parenting kids who favor one parent over the other!

    Reply

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