BABY ALMOST LOOSES HIS LIFE AFTER BEING WRONGLY INJECTED IN HOSPITAL. BABY ALMOST LOOSES HIS LIFE AFTER BEING WRONGLY INJECTED IN HOSPITAL.
It was a simple fall and a routine scan that nearly cost baby Declan Campbell his life. Declan fell from his cot during lunch... BABY ALMOST LOOSES HIS LIFE AFTER BEING WRONGLY INJECTED IN HOSPITAL.

It was a simple fall and a routine scan that nearly cost baby Declan Campbell his life.

Declan fell from his cot during lunch time and received a lump on the head. The lump was so big and his mother, Jessica Newsome was so worried too, that she took him to Nepean Hospital’s emergency department, in Sydney’s west.

He was seen immediately by staff who advised a CT scan was needed. But Declan’s age also meant he needed to be sedated.

And that’s where the critical error occurred.

A doctor injected him using the wrong syringe, making Declan’s lips turn blue and he struggled to breathe.

“His body just froze,” Ms Newsome said.
“He was just limp. He was just nothing. He went straight pale. I said to the doctor ‘something’s wrong’. He just picked the kid up and ran.”

The staff member in CT began bawling, Ms Newsome also said – and she knew something had gone horribly wrong.

Declan stopped breathing for 90 seconds, and Ms Newsome watched as they carried her little boy and placed him on a metal tray.

What went wrong is marked on the child’s discharge papers: “In emergency, ED doctor accidentally administered 12mg of intravenous Suxamethonium instead of administering 12mg of Ketamine to child.”

Suxamethonium is a powerful drug used to cause short-term paralysis as part of general anaesthesia – much more powerful than ketamine. Both syringes were in the same tray.

Ms Newsome called her partner Blake Campbell in a panic and he rushed there from work.

“Something should have been so simple,” Mr Campbell said.

“Just go for a quick CT scan just to make sure he had no problems and it happened to turn out to be he nearly died.”

The hospital apologised to the couple at the time and said they would launch a full investigation into how the mistake occurred.

“While the baby was in the emergency department, the treating doctor apologised for the mistake and provided full disclosure, explaining to the parents what had happened and a social worker provided support to the parents,” Nepean Hospital’s director of medical services, Dr Peter Thomas, told 9NEWS.

“The Director of the Emergency Department also met with the parents that day and apologised.

“The baby recovered and the Hospital will implement the recommendations of the review to prevent the mistake from happening again.”

The family and hospital are due to meet in the next fortnight.

Health Minister Brad Hazzard said Nepean Hospital is receiving $1 billion for a rebuild but there’s always more that can be done.

He said all hospitals have been under pressure, particularly in the last 12 months off the back of a bad flu season.

“Nepean Hospital is an incredible hospital with first-class staff but like any hospital anywhere in the world, it is a human system and from time to time mistakes will occur,” he said.

“My message to the staff is we must learn from those mistakes and ensure we don’t repeat them and that’s very clearly the efforts being made by the health staff at Nepean.”

It’s a small comfort for Declan’s parents who say they still have nightmares about their ordeal.

Obinna Onyia

  • Tanisha Gordon

    2018-06-04 #1 Author

    Oh my goodness that’s terrible

    Reply

  • Daysha Merriwether

    2018-06-05 #2 Author

    This Is Sad And The Doctor Should Have Payed Attention , So That Mistakes Like This Won’t Happen . Happy The Baby Is Doing Okay.

    Reply

  • Shy

    2018-06-06 #3 Author

    This is so sad 😞 We post to trust doctors to make our babies better not almost take their life

    Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *